Should You Ask Reporters for Corrections?

Last week I listened to a great podcast by ProPublica’s Justin Elliot and Eric Umansky about what happens when sources complain about stories. In the piece, Elliot relayed interactions he and his colleagues had had with the Red Cross, who sent a 5,000-word request (longer than the reported piece) for changes to several aspects of the story, including some that were factually inaccurate and irrelevant. For example, they said the reporters failed to include specific quotes, when in fact, they were in the original story. … Read more…

Week in Review

This was one of those weeks for news that you will remember for the rest of your life. Future generations will ask where you were and how the day’s events made you feel. Savor these moments and memories because really, runaway llamas and color changing dresses are once-in-a-lifetime events, people. Once you’ve recovered from the internet breaking, scroll down for updates from your favorite team. What’s new this week: NASPA was featured in a USA TODAY editorial debate about colleges and binge drinking. The op-ed … Read more…

Five Things PR Pros Can Learn from House of Cards

If you’re one of the few people who are unaware, season three of House of Cards will be released tomorrow on Netflix. It will be the reason many of your coworkers call in “sick” or that a snow day is declared even if there isn’t much snow on the ground. Earlier today, in the middle of a battle with writer’s block, one of my colleagues suggested that I write a blog about what PR professionals can learn from watching the show. If you are familiar … Read more…

A Responsibility to Speak Up

While skimming the columns of my Tweetdeck late last week, I saw a headline that caught my eye: “Do the Loudest ‘Expert’ Voices on Education Have the Least Expertise?” The link took me to a Chronicle of Higher Education thumbnail of some recent University of Illinois research that quantified expertise in education and correlated it with media citations. (You can read the full summary here.) The bottom line findings from the research—people with the least expertise in education policy debates are often the most cited … Read more…

Week in Review

This week, I learned an important lesson about working at TVP Communications. Don’t break Teresa’s heart. Or maybe the lesson was don’t admit when you don’t get pop culture references, lest you be shamed on social media… Another important lesson from TVP Comms: always scroll down to read what’s going on with the team. What’s new this week: Drake University’s Paul Morrison talked about his “love affair” with the institution over the past 70 years.  NASPA wrote an open letter to lawmakers urging legislators in … Read more…

Pushing Back for APUSH

I am dumbfounded—and even that isn’t strong enough to describe my feeling—that Oklahoma lawmakers are trying to block funding for AP U.S. History courses. Really, people? REALLY? You know what’s a really great way to make U.S. students more college ready? Taking away classes that prepare them for college. High school students need access to challenging courses like AP U.S. History (or APUSH, as I lovingly called it), and I know teachers, professors, and historians can make more eloquent cases for its value than I … Read more…

When a Tweet Becomes a Nightmare

Last Friday I staked my claim to discuss the New York Times Magazine piece, “How One Stupid Tweet Ruined Justine Sacco’s Life,” because the writing drew me in and the application to our field is invaluable. (When you read it, follow it with the related and referenced piece on Gawker entitled, “Justine Sacco is Good at Her Job and How I Came to Peace with Her” and then The Atlantic piece, “A Social-Media Mistake Is No Reason to Be Fired.”) The Times piece is a cautionary “must read” for anyone in our … Read more…

Media Pros: Time to Start Snapping

I remember waffling on whether or not to join Twitter and seriously questioning not only its staying power, but also its usefulness. Now I can’t imagine doing media relations work without it. For staying up to date on the latest breaking news and trends and for getting to know journalists’ interests, there’s nothing better. Yet, despite how much I have come to value Twitter, I remained resistant to Snapchat, which I viewed as nothing more than a place for teens to post questionable (and regrettable) … Read more…

Week in Review

Despite the fact that it’s Friday the 13th, there’s a lot of love in the air. Media relations is taking a lesson from online dating, Drake University is offering singing Valentines, and a Wheelock College professor is boycotting Fifty Shades of Grey for a great cause. Plus, not only is today Galentine’s Day, but it’s also Kristine Maloney’s birthday (and as a gift, the sun came out in New England for the first time in a week). And since tomorrow is Valentine’s Day, this TVP … Read more…