Week in Review: April 20, 2018

What’s new this week: In an essay for U.S. News & World Report, Professor Nicholas Tampio of Fordham University makes a case to ditch the SAT. Wheelock College President David Chard and Vice President for Academic Affairs Mary Churchill joined forces for this Inside Higher Ed piece to discuss the difficult financial decisions small colleges make. New research from Farmer School of Business professor Sina Esteky shows that stock investors on higher floors take more risks. Read more about why in this CNBC article, which original ran … Read more…

Don’t Try to Be Funny on Twitter

Recently, Teresa and I were discussing some social media best practices to present to a client and she mentioned that “humor rarely works on Twitter.” I could not agree more. While there are plenty of companies (mostly B2C) that have a more casual brand identity and have customers that appreciate a well-timed meme or joke on current event, it is so hard to get humor right on Twitter that it’s best individuals and organizations who are promoting their professional brand stick to thought leadership and … Read more…

Week in Review: April 13, 2018

What’s new this week: Farmer School of Business professor Sina Esteky shares his findings on how our financial and consumer decisions are affected by factors in the built environment—like investors on higher floors taking more risks—in The Conversation. The article also appeared in The Chicago Tribune and MarketWatch. Reverend Lyn Pace, chaplain at Oxford College of Emory University, weighs in on how we’ve become a nation of haters for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. On Holocaust Remembrance Day, Professor Daniel Reynolds of Grinnell College explains why Poland’s new Holocaust … Read more…

Week in Review: April 6, 2018

What’s new this week: Scripps College Professor Sean Flynn shares his expertise with the Daily Bulletin on how Trump’s steel tariffs could impact southern California’s economy.  In a piece for Inside Higher Ed, Hiram College President Lori Varlotta explains how getting out of the office helps her better understand what’s going on around campus. Grinnell College sets its students and alumni up for business success with its Pioneer Weekend. Read this Business News Daily article to learn more. Monique Frost, director of career and professional … Read more…

Week in Review: March 30, 2018

What’s new this week: In a piece for The Washington Post, Professor Barbara Trish of Grinnell College explains why politicians are so eager to claim the outsider mantle. Her essay was also referenced in a Crain’s Cleveland Business article. Brad Lindberg, director of financial aid at Grinnell College, shares his expertise in U.S. News & World Report’s ultimate guide to understanding college financial aid. The Chronicle of Philanthropy highlighted a new study by Lipman Hearne on what drives the wealthiest philanthropists to give—and it’s not … Read more…

Breaking Away from Breaking News

I regularly assess and reassess how I’m interacting with the news—not only when, where, and how I’m consuming it, but its various effects on me as well. It’s an ongoing battle, finding the balance of being informed without being overwhelmed. It seems like it’s becoming something of an annual thing for me (here are my thoughts from 2017 and 2016), so I’m sharing some adjustments I’ve made for 2018 that are working so far. And no, it’s not quitting Facebook—I quit years ago. (I still … Read more…

Week in Review: March 23, 2018

What’s new this week: Don’t miss this Salon piece from Professor Kevin Doyle of Longwood University on what we need to solve the opioid crisis—and it’s not executing drug dealers. Mercersburg Academy is making headlines again, this time in the Central Penn Business Journal, for its plan to cut tuition to address affordability and accessibility. Congratulations to AGB board chair and Drake University trustee David Miles on his Chronicle of Higher Education piece in which he explains what he wishes he had known when starting … Read more…

Five Things I Wish I Knew When I Started in PR

When I landed my first job in public relations, I was coming right out of the television newsroom. While I had transferable skills, this was my first foray into the industry. If you are just starting out in public relations, here are a few lessons I learned along the way. 1. When a reporter asks you a question, never say yes or no, or repeat the question. For example, if you are dealing with an issue at your institution and a reporter asks if anyone … Read more…

Week in Review: March 16, 2018

What’s new this week: In this month’s issue of PR for People, Sarah Glover of the Public Education and Business Coalition weighs in on the traits that define a great teacher. Be sure to check out this Wall Street Journal review of Common Core: National Education Standards and the Threat to Democracy, a new book from Fordham University professor Nicholas Tampio. His book offers an overview of the Common Core movement as well as an argument against national standards as the solution to our education … Read more…

Walt Disney World Implements Resort Parking Fee, Outrage Ensues

One of the more fascinating communities I consider myself a fringe member of is the Walt Disney World fan community. We’re a passionate bunch, planning trips with an intense level of detail and discussing menu changes and ride updates at length on message boards and in social media groups. A favorite phrase when the Disney company makes a decision that the community disagrees with is “Walt is rolling in his grave!” That nonsensical phrase was most recently recalled when Disney announced that they would begin … Read more…