Week in Review: March 9, 2018

What’s new this week: Congratulations to Marc Rubin and the Farmer School of Business at Miami University—Rubin has been named dean of Farmer. Professor Leif Brottem of Grinnell College explains why women miners shouldn’t be seen as victims in a piece for Reuters. This week on Inside Higher Ed’s Call to Action blog, learn more about what’s in a marketing strategy. What we’ve been talking about: CommPro featured Cristal’s piece on why Hope Hicks using the term “white lies” gives all PR pros a bad … Read more…

Don’t Be a Smug Morning Person

When I was a teenager, I slept over my best friend’s house quite often. We’d have a grand time, and come morning, the large number of parrots her family kept as pets and I would wake up approximately around 6 a.m. They’d squawk happily, I’d read a book from my friend’s bookshelf and the rest of house would slumber peacefully until at least 10 am. Not much has changed—no matter the circumstance, I’m ready to start my day by 7 a.m. What I try to … Read more…

Week in Review: March 2, 2018

What’s new this week: Grinnell College professors Mark Montgomery and Irene Powell weighed in for The Conversation on why international adoptions have experienced such a steep decline in the past decade. The piece also ran in The LA Times, The Chicago Tribune, The Houston Chronicle, and MSN News. The Academy Awards are this weekend, so Hollywood is top of mind for many of us. Roberto Pedace of Scripps College joined a discussion on 1A to share insights on diversity in film and help make the … Read more…

The Term ‘White Lie’ Gives All PR Pros a Bad Name

When Hope Hicks used the term “white lie” while testifying about the Russia investigation to the House Intelligence Committee she gave all public relations professionals a bad name. As a professional communicator, the term “white lie” should not be in your vocabulary much less used.  Honesty and transparency is an important part of our industry.  When people use the words “spin,” “alternative facts” or “white lie” in relation to our work, it gives people the false impression that our industry exists to help people cover … Read more…

Balancing Act: How, if and when to push good news during a crisis

There’s never a good time for a crisis, but the months leading up to May 1, the all-important decision (and deposit) day, are particularly inconvenient. They are also prime time for crises to break, and if January has been an indication of how the rest of the spring semester will go, institutions should prepare for an extended media relations balancing act. While crisis-related communications must take priority when a situation breaks, other media outreach can only be put on hold for so long—particularly when it … Read more…

Week in Review: Feb. 23, 2018

What’s new this week: In a piece for Salon, Grinnell President Raynard S. Kington writes about the importance of talking to young people about sexual health and ethics. Douglas Hicks, professor of religion and dean of Oxford College of Emory University, wrote a piece for Fortune on the life and impact of Billy Graham. Scripps College Professor Sean Flynn talks to U.S. News & World Report about how Congresses new spending bill and the soaring deficit will impact the economy. Principal David Roll and Resident … Read more…

This IS Us

I’ve been a huge “This is Us” fan since the series debuted and love how the show has included the higher education search and selection for the Pearson triplets in its storytelling. Perhaps my favorite episode focuses on Randall’s college search. In this episode, a high-school-aged Randall, who is Black, asks his white dad to expand his college visits to include Howard University. His dad, Jack, hadn’t considered an HBCU for his son. In Jack’s mind, his son would attend an Ivy League school—the type … Read more…

Week in Review: Feb. 16, 2018

What’s new this week: In a piece for The Conversation, Professor Kenneth Carter of Oxford College at Emory University explains how a thrill-seeking personality helps Olympic athletes succeed. It also ran in The Chicago Tribune, The L.A. Times, Good Sports, and Public Radio International (PRI). Additionally, Carter appeared on the radio show Calgary Today with Angela Kokott to discuss the Olympic advantage for thrill seekers. Carter also lent his expertise to a U.S. News & World Report article on protecting your heart from negative emotions. … Read more…

PR at the Olympics

I’m definitely not an avid sports fan, and typically during major televised sporting events that I’m forced to watch, you can find me near the snack table with my book. However, I make an exception for the Olympics—the games are usually exciting, they stir up my patriotism, and there’s no shortage of underdog and comeback stories (which, in my opinion, make for the best sportsball watching). During these 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, I find that I’m not only mesmerized by feats of athleticism. There … Read more…

How Do I Pitch Thee?

In honor of the chocolate-, flower-filled holiday coming up this week, I wrote a Valentine’s Day poem for my public relations and journalist friends alike.  It’s based on How Do I Love Thee? by Elizabeth Barrett Browning. How do I pitch thee? Let me start this way I have a story that has depth and breadth and height If you send it to your editor, he/she will think it’s out of sight For it has a beginning, a middle and an end Your readers/viewers will … Read more…