This week has been a challenging one for me. On Saturday, I dropped my laptop at the Apple store for a little work-up, only to find out I was dealing with a bigger problem than I thought, so off my little darling went to the computer hospital for a five-day stay. On the upside, I learned that I can accomplish most of what I need to do on a given day on my phone and a creaky old computer, though not with my usual speed or aplomb. You can imagine my delight when I was reunited with my laptop yesterday, which I celebrated with a cupcake.

Celebrating my reunion with my laptop with a @bakedandwireddc cupcake. As you do.

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If the only thing you want to be reunited with this week is the latest higher ed news, scroll down.

What’s new this week:

College of the Holy Cross Professor Don Brand followed up last week’s piece on impeachment, which was the second most popular on Fortune’s site, with a look at whether or not President Trump was right to fire FBI Director James Comey.

As the higher education community and the nation reacted to the death of a Bowie State University student following a stabbing at the University of Maryland, NASPA President Kevin Kruger shared his perspectives on hate groups, social media, and the intersection of the two on campus in this Inside Higher Ed story and this piece in The Chronicle of Higher Education.

We’re all gearing up to spend more time outdoors this summer, so Drake University professor and tick-borne illness expert Geoffrey Wall shared tips for managing the risk of a tick bite with CNN.

Holy Cross’ Bridget Campolettano and our own Cristal Steuer wrote about the strategy behind taking the Holy Cross story to a new audience through the Ram-Crusader Cup, a gridiron battle played at the iconic Yankee Stadium. Read more about the effort on the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities website.

This week on Inside Higher Ed’s Call to Action blog, get advice on how to use sub-brands to add depth and nuance to a core institutional brand.

What we’ve been talking about:

Cristal shared advice for commencement speakers gleaned from her extensive experience watching commencement speeches.

What’s next on our calendars:

Erin, Teresa, and Ali will be in Washington, DC to attend the 70th National EWA Seminar May 31-June 2.

Erin will be facilitating a session on understanding media relations for the American Council on Education’s National Women’s Leadership Forum in Washington, DC, on June 22.

What we’re recommending:

Kristine Maloney

It’s almost like the editors of The Chronicle of Higher Education introduced their new Foodnotes column as a gift specifically for the TVP Communications staff. The combined focus on academia, women’s history and food—and the inclusion of a recipe with each post—checks so many of the boxes that make us happy. And, with conference season quickly approaching, the upcoming column on “strategic conference eating” is particularly intriguing. In the meantime, I’m going to get going on those lemon-iced sugar cookies.

Erin Hennessy

Over the last several weeks, I’ve been watching coverage and reading perspectives on the removal of statues that venerated figures of the Confederacy in the city of New Orleans. In total, four statues came down, the last on Friday, but the debate about the decision will likely rage on over the coming months and possibly years. The man behind the removal, Mayor Mitch Landrieu, gave an impassioned speech last week, just hours before the fourth statue, this one of Gen. Robert E. Lee, was removed. While the speech likely won’t put an end to the debate, it is some of the finest speechwriting about one of the most difficult issues we as a nation face, and it is well worth a read.

Cristal Steuer

Recently, Jim Braude and Margery Eagan of Boston Public Radio were joined on a broadcast by Boston Globe Editor Brian McGrory. McGrory was talking about how the Globe newsroom sent pizza to the Manchester Evening News this week as they report around the clock on the terror attack in Manchester. The tradition started when the Chicago Tribune sent the Globe lunch during the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombings as a way to support fellow journalists while they were working all hours of the day to report breaking, and mostly heart-wrenching, news.

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Here’s a look at what we were tweeting this week: